Director: Gabriel Galand (ABOVE THE MIST)

Director Biography – Gabriel Galand

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Gabriel Galand is a film director and cinematographer from France, currently based in Vancouver, BC, Canada. He started as a director in 2010 when he moved London, UK, to study the basics of filmmaking. Moving back to France in 2011, he enrolled at the international film school of Paris where he majored in cinematography. Upon receiving his bachelor of fine arts in 2014, Gabriel presented two of his short films “Cold Green Eyes” and “Horla” to festivals, receiving more than sixty selections around the world. Later, Gabriel moved to Seoul, South Korea where he directed commercials and videos for Korean and international brands, all the while collaborating with other artists. After spending a year and a half in Korea, Gabriel directed “Above the Mist”, a short film on assisted suicide, before moving back to France. Collaborating with a Swiss-American producer, Gabriel directed his fifth short film “Resilience” in Switzerland before moving to Vancouver, British Columbia.

Director Statement

To whom it may concern,

I would like to submit my most recent short film, “Above the Mist” to your festival, a drama/thriller dealing with South Korea’s biggest struggle: being the country with the highest suicide rate in the world.

After living a year in Seoul, a beautiful, clean and modern city, I was shocked to hear so many people committed suicide. It is in fact estimated that around forty Koreans kill themselves every day, and most often in a violent way. It is said the high rate is due to stifling poverty in the elderly, with many of them feeling out of touch with the country’s modern culture and economy. But it’s also a big problem amongst the youth who are facing a strong social pressure to succeed and uncertainties about the economic future.

My film is a reflection of this social issue but also an advocation for a stronger fight against suicide. I believe Korea should invest more time into this issue, whether it’s in poverty relief or offering remedies to persons suffering from physical and/or mental pain.

As a director, I first envisioned this film as a fantasy but decided to go instead for a more crude approach, developing it into a drama/thriller. For this new project, I also wanted to experiment with the short film genre; firstly with the film’s structure, striving to make the narrative less predictable but also with the sound. In fact we did not record any sound on set, preferring to build the complete soundtrack in post-production. This was possible since we had few dialogue and worked extensively in post doing ADR, Foley and sound design.

I hope that the film will grasp your curiosity!

Best regards,

Gabriel

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Director’s BIO: Jean-Claude Leblanc

Playing at the HORROR Short Film Festival in October 2017

http://www.jeanclaudeleblanc.com/

JCL is a Vancouver based product design studio that is inspired by natural materials and old world techniques. Working with artisans and manufacturers using traditional methods such as slip casting and stonework results in dynamic and inimitable pieces rooted in the past with a nod to the future.
Born in Canada, Jean-Claude LeBlanc grew up in a rural bilingual town in Saskatchewan. His Mother made art for their home using local materials such as wood, flowers, and wool. Working at his Father’s lumber mill, he gained valuable knowledge about the manufacturing process and developed a hands on approach to creating.
In the late 80’s, LeBlanc moved to the city and discovered skateboarding. Customizing and personalizing his style and gear became his obsession, shaping his vision to this day. LeBlanc’s interest in design grew as he discovered the work of fashion designers and architects, most notably, RAIC Gold Medal receiver Peter Cardew, who later became his mentor and Architect on several projects including the Lieutenant Governor Award-winning ‘LeBlanc House’.
With no formal design education, LeBlanc has started several companies ranging from residential construction to fashion design. His clothing brand Blanc & Noir compelled LeBlanc to travel extensively, visiting manufacturers in Japan and Italy to resolve details and further his knowledge on how things are made. This exposure to technology and craft focuses his work towards projects which allow him to create objects which are both raw and enduring.

Director BIO: Mia’kate Russell

Playing at the HORROR Short Film Festival in October 2017

Director Biography

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Mia’kate Russell has written, co-produced, and directed three multi award-winning shorts: ‘Auditioning Fanny’ (2012); ‘Swallow’ (2013), and ‘Death By Muff’ (2014).

Her forth short film ‘Liz Drives’ is a horror/drama short about two estranged sisters Liz and Ellie.

It is proudly female written, produced, directed and stars.

Mia’kate also works as a head of make-up and special effects artist. Credits include: ‘’What If It Works?” (2017); ‘Pawno” (2015); ‘Crawlspace’ (2012); ‘Red Hill’ (2010); ‘The Wheel’ (2017) and ‘Scare Campaign’ (2015).

She has recently completed two feature screenplays ‘Penny-Lane is Dead’ and ‘TOMMY’.

Director BIO: David Jeffrey

Playing at the HORROR Short Film Festival in October 2017

Director Biography

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David Jeffery is known to his colleagues as one of the hardest working Producer/Directors in Hollywood. When he’s not working on “Bones,” the quirky forensic series on Fox (225 episodes, including the pilot) or co-producing the upcoming -event mini series, “Prison Break,” (also on Fox), Jeffery thrives in the indie movie world, as an award winning filmmaker.

He produced and co-directed the critically acclaimed feature documentary “Lesson Plan: The Story of the Third Wave” which garnered Jeffery two awards, Best Director and Best Feature Documentary at the 2012 Independent Filmmakers Showcase. After playing in dozens of film festivals around the world, “Lesson Plan” is now available on I-tunes distributed by Journeyman Films.

In his first professional effort, Jeffery wrote, produced and directed the horror/thriller “The Last Stop Café” which debuted at the Nashville Film Festival before becoming a popular short on the festival circuit. The film earned numerous awards including three Tellys, a CINE Golden Eagle and the Best Horror Short film prize at Shockerfest. Lead actress Christie Lynn Short received a best actress nomination at the Eerie Horror Film Festival.

David is a member of the Producers Guild of America and the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences. He began his career in New York City after receiving his BFA in Film Production from NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts. An avid scuba diver, Jeffery resides in Los Angeles.

Director Statement

“Girl #2” was a chance to simultaneously poke fun and pay homage to the scary, fun and cheesy sorority horror movies of the 1980s. These films tend to get maligned by critics but a few of them contain some really great plot twists, charismatic performances and sharp dialogue.

It goes without saying, every film poses its own unique set of directorial challenges, but for me, the first was to dupe the audience into believing they were watching a credible B horror movie for the first few minutes. Hopefully, the horror film aficionado will see these first moments as laced with imagery that indicates the tone is bordering on satirical. To the average viewer however, these images are seen as merely building the tension of the story. The second challenge was to edit the film in such a way that no one saw the comic twist coming, a task that took months of experimentation and testing to nail down!

In terms of visual style, cinematographer Brad Lipson and I perused and studied countless horror films. The look of the 2013 hit “The Conjuring” proved inspirational. Like any horror film, we made sure we had plenty of slow moving steadicam shots in the first few minutes of the picture. When the tone of the film shifted, we opted for a more locked down or hand held style of shooting.

Our music style proved itself unique as well. Masterfully composed by Sean Callery, Julia Newmann and Jeff Lingle, the score shifted from a classic horror film menacing tone to something quirkier and yet unnerving in just nine minutes.