HORROR BEST Scene Screenplay of THE WICK INN, by Robert Rosenbaum

 

Genre: Horror, Drama

Patrick, a burnt-out blogger, more interested in writing a graphic novel, takes a road-trip with a couple buddies to Napa Valley to cover the legendary Pagan ball.

CAST LIST:

Narrator: Jane Hailes
Lance: Nick Wicht
Märet: Penelope Park
Kiki: Kelci Stephenson
Patrick: Charles Gordon
Nick: Todd Thomas Dark

Get to know the writer:

What is your screenplay about?

A down-on-his-luck journalist and his buddies head to Napa Valley for a Halloween celebration and end up staying in an inn run by seductive witches. When the valley is attacked by an evil sorceress, the boys team up with the witches and employ their paintball skills to help defeat the demons.

What genres does your screenplay fall under?

Horror / Comedy / Fantasy

Why should this screenplay be made into a movie?

The Wick Inn is a comedy/horror film that combines “Sideways” and “Charmed” with a touch of “Rocky Horror”. Throw in the paintball elements in the final battle and you have a fun and thrilling film that will appeal to the broadest audience.

How would you describe this script in two words?

Fantastical fun!

What movie have you seen the most times in your life?

Probably “A Christmas Carol”, as I watch it (in various versions) about a half a dozen times every year during the holidays!

How long have you been working on this screenplay?

About a year and a half.

How many stories have you written?

Dozens.

What is your favorite song? (Or, what song have you listened to the most times in your life?)

I am a big Beatles fan. I would have to say it would be one of the songs on the Sergeant Pepper’s album.

9. What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

Researching paintball. I am not a player, so I watched a lot of video of paintball tournaments and interviewed friends who are avid players.

Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

My wife and I founded Rosemary Farm Sanctuary where we rescue horses in need.

You entered your screenplay via FilmFreeway. What has been your experiences working with the submission platform site?

FilmFreeway is the best platform of its kind. The dashboard is so organized and easy to use. I can easily keep track of all my submissions and watchlist all the festivals in which I have an interest.

What influenced you to enter the f.estival? What were your feelings on the initial feedback you received?

I found you on FilmFreeway and your description really sounded like a good fit for my film. I was thrilled with the feedback. I could tell the reader really read my script and took time to evaluate it. His insight was a great help in my rewrites.

***

Producer: Matthew Toffolo http://www.matthewtoffolo.com

Director: Kierston Drier
Casting Director: Sean Ballantyne
Editor: John Johnson

Camera Operator: Mary Cox

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Horror Best Scene Reading – THE LEGEND OF YAKATUTCH by Sean Francis Ellis

Watch the winning January 2017 Horror Best Scene Screenplay Reading.

Best Scene from the screenplay THE LEGEND OF YAKATUTCH Screenplay
Written by Sean Francis Ellis

SYNOPSIS:

Genre: Horror, Action, Sci-Fi

In the Canadian wilderness, a snowboarding champion must embrace his indigenous legacy to save his girlfriend from a legendary creature, which has kidnapped her in order to become human once more.

CAST LIST:

NARRATOR – Julie Sheppard
CLAUDE – Hugh Ritchie
ELDER – David Occhipinti
THOMAS – Robert Notman

Get to know the writer:

What is your screenplay about?

A young man, the descendant of a First Nations warrior, must embrace his destiny in order to save his girlfriend from a legendary creature, which has escaped its icy prison and threatens his small Canadian town.

The story explores our relationship with nature and the loss of traditions that once kept us in balance with it. It is a redemption story, and a coming-of-age story, about the passing of traditional values from one generation to the next.

What genres does your screenplay fall under?

Action, Adventure, Horror.

Why should this screenplay be made into a movie?

“The Legend of Yakatutch” is inspired by a long tradition of ‘Creature-Features’, which includes blockbuster franchises “Jurassic Park”, “Jaws” and “The Mummy”. Recent hits like “Godzilla”, “Pacific Rim”, The “Twilight” Series and “Snow White and the Huntsman” prove the genre remains popular internationally, with many more examples on TV, like “The Walking Dead”, “True Blood”, “Grimm”, “The Vampire Diaries”, “Roswell”, “Smallville”, “Sleepy Hollow”, “Supernatural”, “Hemlock Grove”, “Haven” and “The X Files”. These hit movies and TV shows all bring to life incredible monsters that excite our imagination, and take us to the fascinating worlds they inhabit.

The mystery of Bigfoot, or Sasquatch, and the creature’s Asian relative, Yeti, have always fascinated the public. Thousands of stories and reported sightings have spawned a culture of pseudo-scientific research, known as ‘cryptozoology’. The character of Yakatutch combines elements of this legendary ‘cryptid’, with Canadian First Nations mythology. But unlike Bigfoot, Yakatutch is a creature that was once an ordinary man.

As humanity faces the threat of extinction caused by our lack of respect for the environment, the conflict between modern man and a creature that represents our primal nature, is a timely one, reminding us that we need to respect the natural environment and learn from the past, if we are to survive. But it also tells a coming-of-age story, about a young hero embracing his destiny through rites of passage that connect him to his heritage and First Nations identity. He must embrace the past to save the future.

The outdoor, ‘filmed on-location’ visual elements of the script would be compelling on the cinema screen. The spectacular frozen wilderness is a dramatic backdrop to the action-adventure elements in the film, with sequences on glaciers and mountains, and within the forests and small towns of the Yukon Territory. Action elements such as snowboard chases, helicopters, airplanes, and off-road vehicles, combined with ancient threats, such as the mysterious curse that created Yakatutch, and his journey to redemption, would produce an exciting and emotionally engaging movie. The mix of First Nations and European/Canadian culture found in the Yukon will also set “The Legend of Yakatutch” apart from recent films in the genre, and give the film broader audience appeal.

How would you describe this script in two words?

Nature triumphs.

What movie have you seen the most times in your life?

Hard to say for sure, but probably “Superman: The Movie”, “The Empire Strikes Back”, or “Raiders of the Lost Ark”.

How long have you been working on this screenplay?

I started writing a version of this script in 2004. It had many of the same elements, but has evolved significantly. I’ve reworked the story several times, with various titles, including “Out of Bounds”, “Prey”, and “Claws”. I’ve also worked on several other feature and short screenplays during that time, but mostly this one.

How many stories have you written?

Dozens since I started writing short stories in school, but there are many more I haven’t written down.

What motivated you to write this screenplay?

When I started this one, I’d written two screenplays in very different genres. The first was a sort of Romantic Comedy with Action, the second was a Crime-Drama with Comedy. So, I wanted to write something closer to what I love watching most, which are movies with lots of suspense, action, and elements of sci-fi or horror. As a nine year old, I was inspired by the Wampa Snow Monster from “The Empire Strikes Back”, and always thought that creature deserved a movie all its own. I felt sympathy for it, living in isolation inside its cave. It was frightening, and Luke killed it to save himself, but it wasn’t a monster in the usual sense. It was just an animal. So I thought it deserved to have its story told.

I was also motivated by my interest in extreme sports like snowboarding, my love of snow-capped mountains, and the cinematic potential that goes with a creature stalking people in the frozen wilderness. As I did research into the Yukon Territory, I became fascinated with the history of the area, the protected wildlife parks and the First Nations who live there. I added these elements to the story and built them into the creature’s backstory.

What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

Many years worth! The obstacles were mostly about making time and finding a space where I could write, and sacrificing other things to make time (like a steady income!). After spending a year or so on the script, I went to the US and stayed for several months at a time in Los Angeles, for about 5 years. I survived on a very tight budget, and after interning and finding a short-lived assistant job, I decided to live as a struggling writer, writing in cafes and libraries. It was lonely, exhausting work. I spent most of 2007 & 2009 writing in LA, then from 2012 to 2015 (back in Australia), writing either part time or full time. At times I had no money, no social life, and my relationships suffered. I invested a lot of savings in the process. I pitched regularly, paid for professional coverage and sought feedback as often as possible, to improve my writing. I had help from a producer in Australia, who was a sounding board for several years, helping me edit and tighten the story. The feedback improved over time, and I believed I had something with potential, so I pressed on. It was a lot of sacrifice, but I learned a lot about writing and myself.

Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

I love everything about film and have been making films since I was 10, using super 8 equipment, then video, to shoot, direct, edit and produce short films. I love history, sociology, art, design, architecture, dance, choreography, music and language, as well as travel and great food. I’m also passionate about social justice, environmentalism, conservation, and the preservation of art for educational purposes.

What influenced you to enter the festival? What were your feelings on the initial feedback you received?

I have entered the festival and received feedback before, which was helpful, so I knew the contest and the services they offer. The feedback I received was encouraging and gave me something new to think about, which I hadn’t really considered before. But I felt some frustration too. It’s always hard to be told what is lacking, or not working, after so much hard work. Feedback is a great way to start you thinking, and to make you look at your story from a new viewpoint. That’s always valuable. I think it helps to get several viewpoints and find a consensus.

Any advice or tips you’d like to pass on to other writers?

While developing your abilities as a writer, develop other skills and passions as well, whatever they are. Balance is key to productivity. Along with good health and plenty of sleep. Observation is a crucial aspect of good writing, and so much of writing is done when you aren’t at your desk. Once you know the concept and the dramatic need of your characters, play the movie in your head whenever you can, so the pacing becomes clearer. Then, you’ll be prepared to drop something if it doesn’t move the story forward. Outlining is so important, and I think the more time you put into plotting the story first, the easier it is to write scenes that will stay in the script.

***

Director/Producer: Matthew Toffolo http://www.matthewtoffolo.com

Casting Director: Sean Ballantyne

Editing: John Johnson


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Horror Best Scene Screenplay Reading: LONG IN THE TOOTH, by Mark Wasserman

Watch the June 2016 Horror Best Scene Screenplay Reading

LONG IN THE TOOTH, by Mark Wasserman

SYNOPSIS:

Genre: Horror, Drama

Lonesome, irritable widower Fred Pierce is a senior citizen with bad teeth who lives in a depressing retirement community in a small New England town. One evening, while conversing with his dead wife in the town cemetery he meets Goth kids Bo and Tana.

CAST LIST:

NARRATOR – Kelci Stephenson
TANA – Tee Schneider
FRED – Julian Ford
BO – Nathan Bragg

Get to know the winning writer:

1. What is your screenplay about?

The story involves an elderly man who gets tricked into believing that blood is the fountain of youth and then starts preying on the young people who befriended him.

2. Why should this screenplay be made into a movie?

For me, the most effective horror films involve anxiety about something specific, whether it’s THE SHINING and alcoholism; ROSEMARY’S BABY and pregnancy, or more recently IT FOLLOWS and sexually transmitted diseases. Certainly those films are much more but still…I like to think that LONG IN THE TOOTH uses the fear of aging in a similar way.

The story features three-dimensional characters; an intriguing setting (Autumn in a small New England town) and a script that can be produced inexpensively.

3. How would you describe this script in two words?

Character-Driven Horror

4. What movie have you seen the most times in your life?

Sunset Boulevard

5. How long have you been working on this screenplay?

I have worked on it off and on for several years.

6. How many stories have you written?

I have written six feature scripts and eight short scripts.

7. What motivated you to write this screenplay?

I wanted to create an original villain with an unusual modus operandi.

8. What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

Like a lot of people, I’m tired enough of vampire stories that I wasn’t particularly keen to write one of my own. Thus I had to remind myself it was an original take on the subject. I hope it is.

Another tough moment was when a wonderful, established actor “attached” and then “unattached” himself to the project. That was very disheartening.

9. Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

Reading, traveling, teaching

10. What influenced you to enter the festival? What were your feelings on the initial feedback you received?

I was curious about the “Horror scene” in Canada and wanted to visit if I won. I found the feedback very instructive and encouraging.

11. Any advice or tips you’d like to pass on to other writers?

Give your scripts to several readers for feedback, then look for consensus. If enough people are saying the same thing about your work.

****

Director/Producer: Matthew Toffolo
Casting Director: Sean Ballantyne
Editor: John Johnson

Horror Best Scene Screenplay Reading from IX, by Eric Irizarry

Watch the June 2016 Winning Horror Best Scene Reading.

IX, by Eric Irizarry

SYNOPSIS:

Genre: Horror, Thriller

A group of kidnap victims endure a sick game by nine killers of a death cult: Leave the room and you die. Stay and live through the fear.

CAST LIST:

NARRATOR – Kelci Stephenson
KEN – Nathan Bragg
IV – Julian Ford

Get to know the winning writer: 

1. What is your screenplay about?

The screenplay is about the survival of eight kidnap victims by a group of nine killers who play an evil game as part of their ritual for a death cult. However, one of the victims is the undercover “IX” :the best killer of the cult. The rules are: Stay in the room…you endure the fear. Leave…and be massacred.

2. Why should this screenplay be made into a movie?

IX is a dark and chilling take on an “escape the room” scenario. It’s filled with an intriguing backstory on the cult’s motives followed by the harsh survival methods one has to use is desperation. It’s variety of characters with ranging personalities make you root for some but hate others. There are a mix of horror elements from slow creepiness to shocking jump scares to frantic chase scenes and also tense torture sequences. The surprise ending takes on a supernatural tone while the audience is left wondering the entire movie of who the “IX” is. I feel it will bring big scares and tension on the big screen.

3. How would you describe this script in two words?

Twisted Suspense

4. What movie have you seen the most times in your life?

Fight Club

5. How long have you been working on this screenplay?

At least six months

6. How many stories have you written?

Around twenty

7. What motivated you to write this screenplay?

I love the horror genre because you can get away with anything creatively and suspend some form of reality. I wanted to mix different elements from movies I love from: Saw to Cabin in the Woods to Scream.

8. What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

Trying to keep track of eight main characters in a single room and nine killers while sometimes mixing them by mistake became an obstacle. Also, trying not to seem like another movie’s rip-off was a huge goal of mine.

9. Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

Working with people for physical rehabilitation, video games, fantasy, science.

10. What influenced you to enter the festival? What were your feelings on the initial feedback you received?

I love the fact that the winners would have the scene or movie acted out and read by professional actors. To see it come to life like that was a big draw. The feedback is always helpful even if you don’t agree with it initially. Sometimes you get tunnel vision and miss things that are obvious to others. I always take feedback on the notion that someone is trying to help you and you must see it from their perspective.

11. Any advice or tips you’d like to pass on to other writers?

Never stop writing no matter what someone says about your writing. Take feedback with an open mind. You will get a thousand “Nos” but only need one “Yes” to make it.

****

Director/Producer: Matthew Toffolo
Casting Director: Sean Ballantyne
Editor: John Johnson

Watch Best Scene Horror GATES OF HELL Screenplay Reading by Pamela Green

Submit your Horror Screenplay to the Festival Today: https://festivalforhorror.com/about/

Best Scene from GATES OF HELL Screenplay
by Pamela Green

SYNOPSIS:

The best scene expert reading of the feature screenplay. Full screenplay to be performed on March 13, 2016 at the festival.

CAST LIST:

NARRATOR – Susan Wilson
EVERETT – Aieron Munro
ATTENDANT – Robert Notman
MABEL – Maya Woloszyn
DALE – Charles Gordon
JEREMIAH – Paul Falkowski
NURSE – Antosia Fiedur
WORKER – Rochelle Burke